Plastic Cover Effect in Banks Regarding COVID-19, ANSYS Fluent Simulation

218.00 $

  • The problem numerically simulates virus particles’ release from a patient’s mouth inside a bank using ANSYS Fluent software.
  • This project is performed in two modes: with and without the plastic cover.
  • We design the 3-D model by the Design Modeler software.
  • We Mesh the model by ANSYS Meshing software, and the element number equals 1570219 and 1618366, respectively.
  • We perform this simulation as unsteady (Transient).
  • We use the discrete phase model (DPM) to define virus particles dispersed from the mouth.
  • We define an Injection as the Droplet which is evaporated.
  • We use the Species Transport model to define evaporating gas species.

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Description

Description

In this project, based on the CFD method and using ANSYS Fluent software, an attempt has been made to simulate virus particles’ release from a patient’s mouth inside a bank. We perform this CFD project and investigate it by CFD analysis.

The present model is designed in three dimensions using Design Modeler software.

The model’s geometry includes a computational domain of the interior of a bank that includes a table, two chairs, and two people. In this modeling, one of the two humans is a sick person. We defined him as the virus’s source via cough.

This model assumes the mouth as the reference surface of the discrete phase virus release. In this simulation, two different geometric models are designed, including a case with no plastic cover and another case considering a thin plastic cover between two people on the table.

The meshing of the model has been done using ANSYS Meshing software. The element numbers are 1570219 and 1618366 for the first case (without plastic cover) and the second case (considering plastic cover), respectively.

Also, a transient solver has been used due to the nature of the project (i.e., particle/virus dispersion).

Plastic Cover Methodology

This study investigates coronavirus particles’ ability to spread inside the bank from a bank customer to a healthy bank employee. This simulation process is performed in two different modes.

In the first modeling, no cover is located between the client and the bank employee to show the virus’s transmission power. In the second model, an attempt is made to make a thin plastic cover between them.

The cover should be defined to demonstrate the process of preventing the transmission of virus particles as a barrier. For the present simulation, the discrete phase model (DPM) is used; Because this model allows us to study a mass of particles discretely or bit by bit in a continuously fluid space.

The physical models of discrete particles defined in this simulation include two-way turbulence coupling, meaning two-way interaction between continuous and discrete phases activating the interaction with continuous phase mode.

Stochastic collision means irregular droplets colliding with each other, coalescence means droplets merging, and breakup implies the droplets’ collapse. The type of discrete phase behavior will also be time-dependent and with a time step of 0.001 s (activating the unsteady particle tracking mode).

After activating the discrete phase model, the injection process must be defined, determining the type and quality of discrete particles injected into the model. In this model, injection particles are defined as Droplets; Thus, water is defined as droplets, and water vapor is defined as an evaporating gas species.

The injection is performed superficially and through the Surface of the patient’s mouth. According to this definition of injection, virus particles from a sick human cough are physically expelled from the patient’s mouth by water droplets evaporating in space.

These virus droplets have a temperature of 310 K, a velocity of 32 m/s, and a flow rate of 0.018 kg/s, emitted at intervals of 0 s to 0.1 s.

The virus particle size during propagation is not constant, and the rosin-rammler-logarithmic distribution method is considered for the diameter’s size.

Following this method and the suitable formulation, the values ​​related to the minimum, maximum and average diameter size determine the exponential parameter of the spread and the number of diameters per injection.

It should be noted that the Droplet mode is applied when the species transport model is also activated. In this model, three different gases, including oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), and water vapor (H2O), are considered, and thus the computational area of ​​our model will have airflow.

Also, the RNG k-epsilon model and energy equation are enabled to solve the turbulent fluid equations and calculate the temperature distribution inside the domain.

Plastic Cover Conclusion

At the end of the solution process, we obtain particle tracking of the virus particles at different time intervals of the simulation process. This particle sequence is based on the residence time of the particles and the particle diameter size.

We perform this simulation process in two modes, with and without the plastic cover. The effect of plastic cover in preventing coronavirus dispersion is evident from the results, demonstrating how the modeled cover can prevent the spread of the virus.

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